Monday, 22 January 2018

Sunday 4th February 2018
2pm in the Education Centre in the Garden


Talk by Gavin Broomhall: The Garden of Remembrance at RM Condor. How the garden was formed and the ethos of what has been created, plus a history of the original house and garden before the MOD took it over.




Sunday, 7 January 2018

Friends' 5k fun run - Ease into '18

Moments...


The leading runners...

The start...

A collection of images can be found here.

Many thanks to all who attended and see you next year.

Thursday, 4 January 2018

Plant of the month January 2018

Fitzroya cupressoides (Patagonian Cypress)
Family: Cupressaceae
Origin: Chile, Argentina
Accession: 2007
Location: Americas








 Fitzroya cupressoides is the largest tree species in South America, native to the temperate rain forests in the Andes of Chile and Argentina, where it grows in poorly-drained volcanic or sandy soils, up to 40–60m in height and 5m in diameter. It was named by Darwin after Captain Fitzroy of HMS Beagle. In 1993 a specimen from Chile was found to be 3622 years old, making it the second oldest living tree species. Heavy logging in the 19th and 20th centuries for its valuable timber, and clearance by fire for agriculture, has led to its current endangered (Red List) conservation status.


Thanks to Maggie Gowland for photographs.


Wednesday, 6 December 2017

Plant of the month December 2017

Carica papaya (Pawpaw, papaya)
Family: Caricaceae
Origin: Tropical America
Accession: 2012
Location: Tropical House

The papaya is a small tree, usually with a single stem, growing from 5 to 10m tall with spirally arranged large, palmately-lobed leaves at the top of the trunk. The lower trunk is conspicuously scarred from former leaves and fruit. Originally from Central America, it is now cultivated in most tropical countries, where it grows rapidly, fruiting within three years. All parts of the plant contain latex, and the enzyme Papain, extracted from green fruit, is used as a meat tenderizer, chewing gum additive and beer clarifier.

Thanks to Maggie Gowland for photographs.