Friday, 8 June 2018

Plant of the Month June 2018

Fraxinus ornus (Flowering Ash, Manna Ash)
Family: Oleaceae
Origin: S Europe, SW Asia
Accession: 1978
Location: Beside native hillside


Fraxinus ornus is a small, round-headed deciduous tree 10-15m in height, with deep green, pinnate leaves and showy panicles of fragrant creamy-white flowers in early summer. It is suitable for drier, calcareous soils, and is frequently grown as an ornamental tree in Europe. It is susceptible to ash dieback, but while this fungus poses a serious threat to other European ash species, F. ornus does not appear to be a natural host of the pathogen. In the past it was cultivated for its sap, and an extract of the sap, mannitol, was used commercially as a sweetener and for producing medicine. Today mannitol can be produced synthetically, and traditional manna production has declined, continuing in just a few rural areas of Sicily.

Thanks to Maggie Gowland for photographs.



Friday, 18 May 2018

The Garden 5k Fun Run proved very successful and was enjoyed by all. Images for the event can be found here.


The time for each runner is given below (let us know if you think there are errors):

number time
1 34.34
2 46.35
3
4 34.35
5 47.57
6
7 46.23
8 36.45
9 35.2
10 34.33
11 34.33
12 35.21
13 34.21
14 29.3
15 43.13
16 28.04
17
18 38.23
19 34.36
20 35.09
21 46.35
22 38.11
23 31.53
24 36.45
25
26 37.24
27 37.19
28 33.48
29 38.23
30 56.09
31 33.59
32 31.55
33 32.39
34 29.32
35
36
37 38.11
38 36.08
39 37.33
40 56.1
41 43.13
42 33.59
43 31.09
44 22.51
45 22.51
46 31.09
47 29.30
48 25.27
49 28.31
50 30.02
51 24.45
52 24.35
53 23.47
54 24.28
55 23.41
56 21.34
57 19.14
58 22.19
59 20.01
60 29.05
61 23.08
62 26.55
63 19.14
64 37.1
65 37.1
66 26.57
67 31.44
68 18.57
69 24.56
70 29.54
71 35.06
72 34.5
73 24.27
74 22.14
75 29.37
76 20.04
77 19.41
78 17.37
79 32.27
80 18.15
81 27.04
82 27.42
83 27.17
84 27.17
85 29.37
86 23.45
87 42.57
88 42.57
89 42.57
90 24.28
91 33.44
92 34.5
93 34.5
94 25.07
95
96 23.47
97 35.15
98 50.5
99 23.36
100 50
101 31.16
102 37.43
103 37.43
104 21
105 35.22
106 35.22
107 40.38
108 26.07
109 44.27
110 44.27
111 26.43

Monday, 7 May 2018

Plant of the Month May 2018

Trillium grandiflorum (wake robin)
Family: Melanthiaceae
Origin: Eastern North America
Location: The Americas

T. grandiflorum is a vigorous rhizomatous perennial forming a large clump of erect stems each carrying a whorl of three broadly ovate leaves and a solitary terminal flower up to 10cm across, with three recurved white petals turning pinker with age. Like many forest perennials, it is a slow growing plant. Its seeds require double dormancy, meaning they normally take at least two years to germinate. Due to its popularity as a garden plant it has been heavily collected from the wild, leading to conservation concerns in some of its native areas. It grows best in deep, moist but well-drained, humus-rich, preferably acid to neutral soil in deep or partial shade.

Thanks to Maggie Gowland for photographs.


Monday, 2 April 2018

Plant of the month April 2018

Helleborus foetidus (stinking hellebore)
Family: Ranunculaceae
Origin: central & Southern Europe
Accession: 1983
Location: near the Evolution Garden

This evergreen perennial grows to 80cm tall and 100cm across, with thick succulent stems, glossy palmate leaves, and drooping yellowish-green cup-shaped flowers in spring. The five petal-like sepals contain numerous stamens, as well as up to ten nectaries, which make them attractive to bees and other insects. Each flower produces up to five seed follicles. Despite its common name, it is not noticeably malodorous, although the foliage is pungent when crushed. It prefers a deep, humus-rich, well-drained soil, and dappled shade, though it is also drought-tolerant. All parts of the plant are poisonous.
Thanks to Maggie Gowland for photographs.


Saturday, 10 March 2018

Plant of the month March 2018

Rhododendron smithii
Family: Ericaceae
Origin: Himalayas
Accession: 1985
Location:  Asia

This rhododendron specimen was collected by George Sherriff in one of his plant-collecting expeditions to the Himalayas, and planted in his garden at Ascreavie, Kirriemuir. After the deaths of Major and Mrs. Sherriff (in 1967 and 1978), the property was sold on, and in 1983 many of the rare rhododendrons were donated to the Dundee Botanic Garden. This is an early-flowering, long-lasting scarlet rhododendron, similar to R. barbatum, but with indumentum on the leaf undersides.

Thanks to Maggie Gowland for photographs.